Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

Private mortgage loans can provide professional real estate investors with quick and more flexible access to funding for investment properties. While typical private mortgage loans often come with higher interest rates, these loans are often easier to qualify for, require less paperwork and are based on the value of the property versus the borrower’s credit. See the following article from REIClub for more on this. 

Written by: Don Konipol
privatelending

You’ve spent the last 4 months trying to get your client a mortgage on his investment property. You gathered all his personal, business and real estate financial information, for not only the property you’re trying to finance but for all his business and property interests. You’ve done projections, forecasts and read through 200 page appraisals. You’ve put together a loan package, sent it to numerous commercial mortgage lenders, only to find out each one needed the same information filled out on their particular unique forms. So you’ve spent dozens of hours more transferring the same information to tens of different applications. You’ve spent numerous hours obtaining “additional information” for each potential interested lender. And now you’ve exhausted all possible institutional mortgage sources and still no loan.

Sound familiar? Perhaps you’re new to the commercial mortgage field. You have been successful originating residential loans, took the NAMB Commercial Mortgage course and decided to expand your practice to include commercial and investment property mortgages. Or maybe you’re already a commercial mortgage broker, successful in obtaining financing for some clients, but feel you just spin your wheels trying to obtain financing for others. The key to spending your time more productively is to understand when institutional commercial mortgage money is NOT available for your client. The key to earning a commission from these same clients is to understand what type of financing may be available for this same client.

Private mortgage loans are loans secured by real estate made by a private lender instead of a bank, lending institution or government agency. Private mortgage loans are short-term (ranging from six months to three years) hard money or asset based loans made to the professional real estate investor for the purchase, rehabilitation or equity cash out of real property. This means that the decision to lend is based on the equity and value of the property being put up as collateral, not on the borrowers credit. The security for the loan is enhanced because the loan represents a maximum of 65% – 70% of the appraised value of the income producing property. On non-income producing property (raw land, lots, construction money) a maximum of 55% loan to value is lent. Investors can expect to pay interest rates of 12% to 14% on first liens and 16% to 18% on second liens in this current low interest rate environment. Historically first lien yield of six points over prime has been obtainable.

Why are real estate investors willing to pay high rates to borrow private money?

When interest rates of 14% to 18% are added to four-to-eight points, the real estate investor/borrower is paying 20% plus annually for the money borrowed. Its obvious why this is a good deal for the private mortgage lender, but why should real estate investors be willing to pay these high rates when conventional mortgage money costs 7% to 10%? There are many reasons, but all fall into four categories.

Qualifying Problems

The real estate investor/borrower and/or the real property does not qualify for an institutional mortgage loan. This can be anything from low borrower credit scores or too much borrower debt, to the borrower’s properties not producing a sufficient enough income. Further, the property itself may not support the type of loan the borrower wants. Many institutional lenders will not loan amounts under $500,000; many will not lend second lien money even if there is significant equity in the property. If major repairs or rehabilitation is necessary, institutional lenders will not be interested unless the project is very large and the borrower has an extensive track record. In these cases the private mortgage lender may be the only resource available for the real estate investor/borrower.

Institutional lenders are concerned with both the appraised value of the property and borrower and property credit. Private mortgage lenders are only concerned with the appraised value, as long as the appraised value represents a fair market price. Hence, if a property is producing or can produce sufficient income to pay the note and the value of the property will fully secure the note and provide sufficient equity, then the borrower’s credit is not an issue for the private mortgage lender.

The Need For Speed

Speed of closing the transaction. Mortgage money obtained from banking or institutional sources, called conventional mortgage money, usually takes between 60 and 90 days to fund. Institutional lenders need not only obtain appraisal of the value of the property, but also require detailed examination of the borrowers credit history and current financial status, as well as financial statements and tax returns, not only for the property collateralizing the loan but for all real property and business interests owned by the borrowing entity and the borrower himself.

Private mortgage lenders on the other hand can usually complete a transaction within seven-to-10 days. Since the property itself is the main criteria to be used to determine loan eligibility, much less information on the borrower and the borrower’s other properties are required, resulting in a much quicker approval process. The private mortgage lender can make a decision within 24 hours of receiving information; institutional mortgage money must be approved by a loan committee that may only meet twice a month, and that may send the loan request back to the loan officer for more information, necessitating a further two week delay until the committee meets again.

Privacy Concerns

Borrowers may not want or be able to provide personal financial information or go through the hassles of the application process associated with obtaining an institutional mortgage loan. The borrower may be going through a divorce or business separation and may not want his wife, partner, government, lawyers, etc. to obtain his personal financial statement. Additionally the borrower may not have all financial information on all his real properties and businesses up to date or complete; he may have filed for an extension on his latest tax return; his accountant may be behind in preparing his financial statements. While all these would negate or at least delay his getting an institutional mortgage, it should have no effect on the borrower’s ability to obtain a private mortgage loan.

More Money

The real estate investor may be able to borrow more from the private or hard moneylender and therefore have less of his own capital invested in the property. Institutional mortgage lenders lend based on the lower of the cost of the property or appraised value of the property; private mortgage lenders lend based on the appraised value only. Hence the real estate investor utilizing a private or hard money loan is not penalized for purchasing the property at a significant discount to market value. Additionally, most private mortgage lenders do not have onerous seasoning requirements to make the loan.

Investment Parameters

The investment parameters for private mortgage loans differ considerably from those of institutional mortgage loans, as we partially discussed in the previous section. The most important parameter to be considered when evaluating a private mortgage loan request is loan to value. This is the ratio of the amount lent expressed as a percentage of the properties value. For example if an office building is worth $100,000 and we lend $65,000 total secured by this office building, then our loan to value ratio, or LTV is 65%.

Private mortgage lenders will typically lend up to 50% on raw land or undeveloped property; 65% on commercial income producing property such as office buildings, shopping centers, warehouses, etc. and 70% on residential income property such as a duplex or apartment complex. The key words here are up to; the maximum amount will be lent if all additional criteria are met and if the lender feels good about the loan, lower amounts can be lent if the loan or borrower is considered less than ideal. This is a gut decision made by the lender with an in depth understanding of the criteria being used and the experience of looking at many lending proposals.

The second parameter is the type of properties to lend on. This is often determined by the comfort the lender has in disposing of this type of property in case of default. All other things being equal, single use property which would take a year to sell is obviously less desirable than a multi tenant office building which would not only sell quickly at 65%-80% of market value, but which would be producing income with tenants paying rents while the property is up for sale.

The third investment parameter the private or hard moneylender is concerned with is the cash flow or income potential of the property being put up as security for the note. Although many private mortgage lenders are liberal in this area, the monthly interest payments to keep the note current must come from somewhere. If the property is rented out and is producing a cash flow after all expenses of an amount at least equal to the note payment, the monthly payments can be covered by the property income alone without the borrower having to come out of pocket. This adds a great degree of safety to the note. Cash flow from other income properties or other sources can be substituted for cash flow from the property being placed as collateral; however, the income to pay the mortgage payments must be available from some source.

The fourth major investment parameter the lender must consider is exit strategy. Very simply, this is how the borrower plans to repay the loan. Since most private mortgage loans are short term the private mortgage lender has a keen interest in finding out the borrower’s exit strategy and in analyzing whether this exit strategy is viable, and the risk of this particular exit strategy. The particular exit strategy must have a reasonable chance of success.

Typical exit strategies include property sale before the note is due, refinancing the property with a long term mortgage loan, packaging the property with other properties owned or to be acquired by the borrower and obtaining a blanket mortgage on all the properties, borrowing on equity in other property owned by the borrower and selling a partnership interest in the property to an equity investor. Each of these strategies has numerous variations. The lender must determine the viability of any particular exit strategy.

Don H Konipol has a BS in Economics and an MBA in Finance from the University of Michigan and is a licensed Texas Real Estate Broker and Mortgage Broker. Mr. Konipol is General Partner of the Managed Mortgage Investment Fund LP, a private limited partnership that invests in short term, high yield private mortgage notes. He can be reached at 832.577.8838 or by email at dkonipol@yahoo.com.

This article has been republished from REIClub. You can also view this article at REIClub, a real estate investment education site.

For those of you looking for cautionary notes going into 2014, I offer two items: jobs and loans.

Despite recent gains, which some of us believe are more of a mirage than an oasis, the economy still isn’t creating enough good-paying full-time jobs to drive a full recovery in the housing market. This is particularly true among the millennials, who continue to live at home with mom and dad at near record levels.

Unemployment—and under-employment—among the 25- to 35-year-old cohort continue to be stubbornly high, which is having a chilling effect on the number of first-time homebuyers—the group that historically has fueled growth in the housing ecosystem. This has led to slower-than-forecast household formation, and increasingly, when new households are formed, they’re rental households.

Some erstwhile buyers have simply decided not to enter into a long-term financial obligation for the time being. Others either don’t have sufficient funds for a down payment or don’t qualify for today’s relatively strict lending requirements.

Those lending requirements—and a lending environment that I believe is going to get more challenging before it gets easier—are the other major headwinds that could slow down housing. While most forecasts are calling for a slight uptick in purchase loans in 2014, it’s easy to build a scenario that goes terribly wrong.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s new Qualified Mortgage (QM) and Ability-to-Repay rules will exclude somewhere between 10-20 percent of borrowers who would have qualified for a loan in 2013. Most of the large banks will issue loans that fall squarely within QM guidelines, simply to avoid as much risk as possible. The one exception is likely to be jumbo loans, offered to ultra-qualified, high-net-worth individuals.

Another complication is lower loan limits proposed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). These lower limits will make it more difficult for borrowers in high-priced housing markets to get loans. Those who do qualify for loans will pay more—the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) recently announced hikes in the GSEs’ guarantee fees and a new, higher payment schedule for borrowers who fall within certain FICO and down payment measures. The FHA has also increased insurance premiums, particularly on its lowest down payment products.

Some believe that by raising costs and limiting loan amounts, the government will drive private capital back into the market, but that seems unlikely until regulatory and litigation risks have subsided, and until loans can be priced appropriately to risk. At some point in 2014, private capital will probably return, along with a more functional secondary market. Then non-bank lenders can come to market with loans available to less-than-perfectly-qualified borrowers, but at significantly higher interest rates.

Higher interest rates, which are inevitable, will begin to erode affordability levels, even with home prices still well off the peak numbers reached during the housing boom. The primary culprit isn’t high interest rates or rising home prices, but lower median incomes and wage stagnation over the past five years.

So which will it be: Full speed ahead, or trouble around the bend? If nothing else, 2014 promises to be a very interesting year.

BY: RICK SHARGA, AUCTION.COM

Many economists and market observers have suggested the market is poised for continued growth as the recovery enters its third year, and there are positive elements in play that provide some reasons for optimism.

Recent loan vintages continue to perform at levels better than historical norms—the default rates on loans from 2011-2013 are virtually non-existent. This has essentially shut off the pipeline of distressed assets, finally allowing the industry to work through the backlog of seriously delinquent loans and loans already in the foreclosure process.

States with non-judicial foreclosure processes have had remarkable success in clearing out the inventory of distressed properties, which is one of the factors driving the housing rebound in states like California and Arizona.

Not coincidentally, foreclosure activity has been declining as well, and this is likely to continue throughout 2014. Unprecedented levels of short sales have been one of the reasons for the decline in foreclosures—every short sale represents one less REO coming to market. And the billions

of dollars of non-performing loan sales have connected distressed borrowers with special servicers, who have managed to modify tens of thousands of loans, preventing more foreclosures.

Investor activity at the low end of the market has had two significant effects: first, investors have gobbled up virtually all available REO homes, and begun to purchase rental properties via short sales and trustee sales.

Second, they’ve helped accelerate home price appreciation, particularly in many of the markets that were hardest hit during the downturn. This, in turn, has dramatically reduced the number of homeowners in a negative equity position, dropping the number of homes in the so-called “shadow inventory” to much more manageable levels.

As home prices have risen, more non-distressed properties have begun to enter the market, helping to ease the inventory shortage of existing homes, and dropping the extremely high percentage of distressed home sales to more reasonable levels than we’ve seen in the past seven or eight years.

Builders have noticed the drop-off in distressed property sales and limited inventory, and housing starts for single-family homes have risen dramatically in the last months of 2013.

So…home sales are up, prices are up, inventory is improving, foreclosures are dropping, and homebuilding is awakening from its long hibernation. What’s there to be bearish about?

For those of you looking for cautionary notes going into 2014, I offer two items: jobs and loans.

Rick Sharga is EVP for Auction.com. Look for the second part of his 2014 commentary on Friday.